FAQ

/FAQ

FAQ

You might want to clarify the answers to these frequently asked questions below concerning the procedures and modalities at Gynescope.

Does the IVF session involve cutting me open surgically?

No. The process does not involve cutting you open. The eggs are picked up within 10 to 15 minutes under light sedation.

Will the IVF process lead to my eggs being exhausted and will I attain menopause earlier than my peers?

No. The process does not deplete your eggs as all we do is recruit eggs in a cycle that ultimately would have died.

Can I have a normal vaginal delivery?

Yes, but with a low threshold for Caesarean Section.

Must I always have IVF for all my future conceptions?

No, but if there are conditions that might make natural conception unlikely, for instance: extremely low sperm count or blocked tubes, then we will usually recommend another cycle.

Will my baby be malformed?

No, though the results are conflicting, available evidence does not suggest an increase in congenital malformations among IVF babies. However, extreme caution is advised for ICSI which unlike IVF is relatively ‘young’ (1978 vs 1992).

Does ICSI increase success rates?

No. ICSI has a better fertilization rate than IVF but the pregnancy rates are the same.

Do I need to be admitted at any time?

No, admission into hospital is not necessary as it has not been shown to increase success rates.

Can I have sexual intercourse with my Spouse?

No, we usually recommend you avoid sexual intercourse about three days before egg collection and for two weeks thereafter.

Is there any food I need to avoid?

Yes, generally avoid sugary food, alcohol and tobacco.

Will my egg or sperm donor be revealed to me?

No, this largely remains anonymous. You can however get information on the physical and psychological attributes.

Can I bring my own donor?

Yes, but we usually discourage this to avoid future skirmishes.

Can I pay in installments?

Yes, but payment needs to be completed before ovarian stimulation.

Can I be given someone else’s eggs or sperms or embryos mistakenly?

No, we avoid running large batches at a time and label all specimens properly.